Central Africa
x

Central Africa

Population

192,599,175

Area

6,547,170 km²

GDP total

$259,770.71 million

Countries

Angola, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Rwanda, São Tomé and Príncipe.

4.86

Criminality Score

3rd of 5 African regions

Criminal market

4.63

Human Trafficking

5.41

Human Smuggling

4.27

Arms Trafficking

5.91

Flora Crimes

5.68

Fauna Crimes

5.59

Non-Renewable Resources Crimes

5.64

Heroin Trade

3.09

Cocaine Trade

2.55

Cannabis Trade

4.36

Synthetic Drugs Trade

3.77

Criminal Actors

5.08

Mafia-Style Groups

3.45

Criminal Networks

5.09

State-Embedded Actors

7.09

Foreign Actors

4.68

2.95

State Resilience Score

5th of 5 African regions

Political Leadership and Governance

2.95

Government Transparency and Accountability

2.32

International Cooperation

3.82

National Policies and Laws

4.18

Judicial System and Detention

2.82

Law Enforcement

3.27

Territorial Integrity

3.73

Anti-Money Laundering

2.91

Economic Regulatory Environment

2.77

Victim and Witness Support

1.86

Prevention

1.95

Non-State Actors

2.77

2.95 5.08 4.63 2.95 5.08 4.63

Central Africa’s criminality score falls below the continental average, placing it third in the regional ranking.

In line with other regions, criminal actors marginally drive up the criminality average for Central Africa, with an average score of 5.08, compared to its criminal markets average score of 4.63. When looking at the criminality components individually, both criminal markets and actors fall below the continental averages (4.68 and 5.25, respectively), suggesting perhaps a more limited distribution of criminality typologies than experienced in other regions. In the context of prolonged conflict in the region and the extensive biodiversity that occurs in many countries in Central Africa, arms trafficking and the environmental markets are far more prevalent than are the drug economies. While the region’s average criminal actors score places this subcomponent in the middle of the regional ranking, state-embedded actors have the highest average score in Central Africa than in any other region on the continent. Central Africa is by some distance the lowest-scoring region in Africa for resilience, with an average score of 2.95. While the region does not perform well on any resilience indicator, collectively it falls particularly short with regard to social protection measures, such as victim and witness support and prevention measures.

Libya

Capital

Tripoli

Population

6,678,567

Area

1,759,540 km²

Coastline Length

1,770 km

Landborder Length

4,339 km

GDP total

$48,319.62 million

GDP per capita

$7,235.03

6.27

Criminality Score

7th of 54 African countries

1st of 6 North Africa countries

Criminal market

5.90

Human Trafficking

9.50

Human Smuggling

8.00

Arms Trafficking

8.50

Flora Crimes

1.00

Fauna Crimes

2.00

Non-Renewable Resources Crimes

8.50

Heroin Trade

2.50

Cocaine Trade

3.50

Cannabis Trade

8.00

Synthetic Drugs Trade

7.50

Criminal Actors

6.63

Mafia-Style Groups

8.00

Criminal Networks

6.50

State-Embedded Actors

8.00

Foreign Actors

4.00

2.13

State Resilience Score

47th of 54 African countries

6th of 6 North Africa countries

Political Leadership and Governance

1.00

Government Transparency and Accountability

2.50

International Cooperation

2.50

National Policies and Laws

2.00

Judicial System and Detention

2.50

Law Enforcement

4.00

Territorial Integrity

2.00

Anti-Money Laundering

1.00

Economic Regulatory Environment

3.00

Victim and Witness Support

1.00

Prevention

1.00

Non-State Actors

3.00

2.13 6.63 5.90 2.13 6.63 5.90

Libya has one of the highest criminality scores in Africa, ranking 7th overall, with the highest score in North Africa.

As with the majority of African countries, Libya’s high overall criminality score is driven by a higher score for criminal actors than for criminal markets. The two types of criminal actor that have the most influence in Libya are mafia-style groups and state-embedded actors. Various mafia-style militia groups control many areas across the country. They are heavily involved in many criminal markets, including drug trafficking, human smuggling, human trafficking and illicit oil smuggling. Libya essentially has two competing governments, both with close links to militia groups and criminal actors. In some cases, they feed off one another, making the political process indirectly dependent on the proceeds of organised crime. With regards to criminal markets pervasive in Libya, human trafficking has a severe negative influence on nearly all parts of society. The country has the highest score in Africa (9.5) and the situation is deteriorating. Four other criminal markets have a severe influence in Libya – human smuggling, arms trafficking, non-renewable resource crimes and the cannabis trade – illustrating the breadth of organised criminal activity affecting the country. While Libya has one of the highest levels of organised crime in Africa, it is also one of the worst-performing countries on the continent for resilience to organised crime. Ranking 47th in Africa, the country's regulatory or institutional frameworks in relation to the 12 building blocks of state resilience are almost all either non-existent or extremely ineffective. The exception is law enforcement, in which the country performs marginally better, with a score of 4. In relation to organised crime, the complete absence of political leadership, anti-money laundering capacity, victim and witness support or prevention measures has placed Libya in an extremely perilous situation.

For a better experience, please rotate your device.

The criminal markets score is represented by the pyramid base size and the criminal actors score is represented by the pyramid height, on a scale ranging from 1 to 10. The resilience score is represented by the panel height, which can be identified by the side of the panel.